Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Dock Diving Dogs

When I'm not doing things with my dogs, I like to watch other people do things with their dogs. (Dog nerd? Probably.) I have a friend who has recently discovered Dock Diving. Saturday was her first trial and I went to support her. OMG, it was awesome! Look:





Good thing it's Wordless Wednesday because I am speechless! Click around below and see what others are sharing today. Later, -- K


Monday, June 26, 2017

Awww...Ice Cream!

Jedi's Doggie Sundae
When I got off work yesterday it was still 89 degrees. When you factor in the humidity it felt like 100 degrees. Ugh. Jedi had been cooped up all weekend. He needed to get out before he drove us all crazy. It was too hot to walk so we went for ice cream instead.

Did you know that Bruster's gives free ice cream cups to their 4-legged customers? Jedi was thrilled to discover that! Our timing couldn't have been better. It started to rain (again!) just as we were finishing our ice cream.

It's Awww...Monday, where a group of bloggers come together to brighten the start of your work week. Does ice cream make you happy? Click around below happy Jedi and see what others are sharing. Thank you Sandee for putting this together each week. Happy Monday! -- K


Friday, June 23, 2017

Dear Beachgoers

This popped up on my Facebook feed yesterday:
Dear Beachgoers,

The heat index temperature today is a hundred and seven degrees. Please leave your dogs at home. I'm sure they'd much rather sit at home in the air conditioning than sit on the hot beach and watch you play in the water. Also, water heats up very quickly in a metal bowl when there is no shade. I've already told several people to take their dogs home, I'll tell you the same.

Signed, Your (Not So) Friendly ACO
Apparently two years ago I was frustrated with people bringing their dogs to a hot beach. Guess what? I still am! WTF are people thinking?

DISCLAIMER: I'm not a fan of the beach. I don't like crowds, oppressive heat or sand that gets into everything. (Or sharks or jellyfish or fat, hairy guys in Speedos or . . . )

If people insist on taking dogs to the beach, I'd like to suggest the following:
Jedi at sunrise
  • Avoid midday. It's hot and full of people. Instead, go early morning or late evening. It's cooler and less crowded. An added bonus: better light for awesome pictures.

  • Keep your dog leashed. Not all beachgoers like dogs. Unless there are signs saying otherwise, always assume the leash law applies on the beach. Helpful tip: don't take your dog's good collar and leash to the beach. The salt and sand will quickly destroy them. Instead, find a collar with a plastic buckle. Check/lubricate/replace leashes regularly. If you're going to take your dog in the water, use a nylon slip lead (like the ones at the vet's office). I know a woman whose beach-used leash didn't work properly when needed. Her dog saw a cat across the street. The clip didn't hold when the dog lunged and he ran after the cat. The dog was hit -- and killed -- by a passing car.

  • Take lots of poop bags. Sometimes dogs get excited and ingest salt water while playing in the surf. Invariably, it gives them the runs. You don't want to leave that lying on the beach! Plus, you'll have extras to share with nearby not-so-great dog owners.

  • I've seen these for $30-$80
  • Bring lots of water and a cooler to keep it in. I can't tell you how many people say "See I have water for my dog" and show me a gallon jug that has been sitting in the sun for the last hour and a half. Also, rethink the metal bowl. It gets hot quickly. Would you want to drink hot water?

  • If you plan on being there all day, bring your own shade. Whether it be a large pop-up canopy or a small portable beach tent, your dog needs something to keep him out of the direct sun. You may be in a bikini, but your dog is wearing a fur coat.

  • DO NOT TAKE YOUNG PUPPIES TO THE BEACH. First of all, young pups are more susceptible to heat stroke. Also, there is a lot of crap (figurative and literal) on the beach. We have hundreds of dogs visit my 2-mile stretch of beach every month. Guess what? Not all of those dogs are owned by conscientious, responsible people. For me, that's job security. For you, that's a possible exposure to parvo, distemper and all kinds of nasty diseases and parasites. (FYI: We also have foxes, raccoons and feral cats on the beach -- I've seen them during early morning patrols -- and they carry a wide variety of cooties as well.) Until your pup is fully vaccinated, avoid the beach just as you would the pet store or dog park.
Yep, I'm Debbie Downer today. That's what I do! Love ya, -- K

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Tuesday Training Crew

A couple months ago I told you that I was finally able to reinstate the German Shepherd Dog Club's weekly training. The good news is that it's still going, despite the afternoon downpours of late. We have a few dedicated members of "The Tuesday Training Crew." And we have a couple more that show up sporadically. I'm disappointed (though not surprised) that we don't have more participants. Any ideas on how to impress upon club members that they should take advantage of this free opportunity to work their dogs and make friends?

Here are a few pictures from Tuesday nights. Don't mind the goofy chick, just look at the beautiful German shepherd.

Working automatic sits. The shirt is Teddy the Dog
and says "Come to the Bark Side." LOVE it!
Jedi's front positions are getting better. The shirt says
"Leave me alone, I'm only talking to my dog today."
Our trainer is a 5 foot tall, 75 year old woman who knows more about training
dogs than I ever will. It's amazing to see her work.


Believe it or not, it's Wordless Wednesday. One of these days the Moderator is going to give me a stern talking to about my overly wordy posts. But for now, just enjoy! Don't forget to click around below and see what others are sharing today! -- K

P.S. No rain last night, so Tuesday Training went on as planned. Yippie!


Monday, June 19, 2017

Canine Infleunza

Have you been following the news about Canine Influenza? Whether or not you have, it's a big deal here in Florida. About three weeks ago I got the following message from a training group:
“We have received reliable information from a vet in Deland that a number of dogs who attended the Deland Dog Show this past weekend have been treated in her office for canine influenza. The same vet reports that one of her patients who attended the show (a young, healthy dog) is currently being treated in Gainesville and is in critical condition. This appears to be a fast developing strain and symptoms typically develop within a few days.”
I thought "Crap! Deland is close." I've shown there before. Then reports came in that sick dogs were coming back from Perry (GA) as well. I've shown in Perry too! What people were assuming was Bordetella (kennel cough) was actually canine influenza. Even worse, this was a newer, stronger virus (H3N2, not H3N8 which has been around for a decade). Within days the University of Florida had confirmed the first 7 cases of H3N2 Canine Influenza Virus in the state of Florida. Last report I heard there were 30 confirmed cases, with dogs sick in Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas. There are an estimated 300+ infected dogs (suspected and treated like flu, but not confirmed through laboratory testing). A majority of these cases are either:
  1. dogs who participated in recent dog shows or
  2. dogs who live with dogs who were in shows.

The dog show community is in a panic. People have pulled out of shows in droves and some clubs have cancelled shows completely. Others clubs are taking precautions with viruscide disinfectants, judges are not handling mouths (exhibitors are showing bites instead), no public x-pens set up, vets on sight the entire show, gallons of hand sanitizer and conspicuous signage warning exhibitors about contamination.

It not just the show community that's worried either. Training clubs all across the state have closed their doors for a week or more. Households with dogs that attended the Perry and Deland shows are asked not to return until July. I know of two June Barn Hunt trials that have been cancelled. Even the 2017 DOCOF (Dog Obedience Clubs of Florida) tournament -- a super big deal that has dog teams train for months -- has been cancelled.

I've been following the news closely. Here's some of the information that I've gleaned from my reading:
  • Canine influenza viruses are relatively new viruses, so virtually all dogs are susceptible to infection because they have not built up natural immunity.

  • The dogs most at risk are those with a social lifestyle, participate in group events or housed in communal facilities. This includes boarding kennels, dog parks, day care centers, shelters, dog shows, training classes, veterinary clinics, pet stores and grooming parlors.

  • Two different canine influenza viruses have been isolated in the U.S. -- CIV H3N8 and CIV H3N2. H3N2 just recently emerged in the Chicago outbreak of 2015. This virus is of avian origin and not related to the earlier H3N8 virus, which is of equine origin. Vets are suggesting that dogs at risk be vaccinated against both viruses.

  • The H3N2 virus is HIGHLY contagious. It's spread by direct contact with an infected dog or contact with a contaminated environment or person.

  • A cough from a sick dog produces invisible virus‐containing mists. These mists can travel more than 10 feet in the air, spreading the virus and quickly contaminating everything around it.

  • The virus is hearty. It can survive in the environment (kennel surfaces, food and water bowls, collars, leashes, toys, beds, etc.) or on people’s shoes, clothing and hands for 12 to 24 hours. However, it's easily killed by washing hands with soap and water, normal laundering of clothing and bedding, and washing bowls and toys. Take away: Wash everything and wash often.

  • Symptoms of influenza include sneezing, coughing and nasal discharge, and symptoms can last for two weeks or more. Many dogs also experience fever, decreased appetite and lethargy. More serious cases can result in pneumonia and require hospitalization.

  • It can take two to five days after infection for symptoms to appear. This means handlers and owners may expose their dog not knowing their dog has been infected. Also frustrating, some infected dogs never get sick -- yet those dogs are as contagious as the sick dogs. However, because these dogs appear to be healthy, owners have no warning to keep them away from other dogs. As for sick dogs, they may remain contagious up to a month after they recover.
Scary, isn't it? When my vet gets back from vacation I want to talk to him about the CIV vaccine. For now, I'm keeping the dogs at home (the oppressive heat and afternoon deluges help). I'll share if/when I learn anything more. Later, -- K


Sunday, June 18, 2017

Show-n-Go

K-9 Obedience Club of Jacksonville (my other dog club) holds an Obedience and Rally Show-n-Go on a regular basis.

A Show-n-Go is a practice trial. There are (unofficial) judges, ring stewards, competitors and classes. The judge scores your performance, but there are no ribbons or placements. Unlike a real trial, you can use treats, toys, praise and corrections in the ring.

The idea of a Show-n-Go is to create as much of a real trial atmosphere as possible so you and your dog can get used to being in a competition without the full stress (or entry fees) of an actual trial. It's a great way to:
  • Rehearse the full set of exercises for a trial, especially if you or your dog are new to the ring.
  • Find out what the dog will and won't do when you can't carry a treat or reward her after every exercise.
  • Cure the ring-wise dog who hates being in the ring because you've never rewarded him with food or play or a toy during a real trial.
  • Desensitize the dog who thinks judges and stewards are scary and evil.
Show-n-Gos are $5 a run, and are a small money maker for the club. The events manned by volunteers. The club offers one free run to anybody who volunteers. The club announced another Show-n-Go was being held on Saturday and RK suggested that we volunteer to:
  • Learn more about how a Rally trial works
  • Use the free run to see how Jedi and Chili perform in a different environment
  • Get feedback from someone other than our regular trainer
In a moment of false bravado I agreed. Then I spent next five days stressing myself out. Our Tuesday training has been rained out for the last month. I meant to practice regularly at home. I didn't. (Surprise!)

I waffled back and forth about taking Jedi to the Show-n-Go and possibly making a fool of myself. Eventually I put on my Big Girl Panties and . . . ended up not doing it after all. I had car trouble and rode to the training site with RK. I volunteered, but Jedi stayed at home. I put on my Big Girl Panties for nothing! I'm so bummed out. Guess I'll go play with Jedi and hope it doesn't rain again on Tuesday. -- K


Saturday, June 17, 2017

Rats and More Rats

A couple weeks back I told you about Hide and Seek, our new rats. After Seek's sudden passing, we had a rough time finding another female rat. I knew Hide was lonely and didn't want her to be alone too long.

Meet Cache
Our rat hunt wasn't any easier than before. We stalked every pet store in town to no avail. Hubby kept saying we should go back to the lizard store and buy another feeder rat, but I was worried about health issues. Like I said before, I don't think feeder rats are held to the same health standards as rats intended to be pets.

I work Sundays but Hubby is off. Sometimes Hubby does crazy things when I'm at work -- like make rat tubes! Last Sunday he made a command decision. He cleaned out an old 10-gallon tank, found the corresponding screen cover and set it up in the dining room. Then he hopped on his Harley and went to the lizard store. Hubby picked out two friendly feeder rats and brought them home -- on his bike. The lizard guy felt so bad about Seek that he offered to replace her for free. He said that sometimes the feeder rats get colds (told you!) and that's probably what happened to Seek.

And Sport
Hubby set the girls up in the dining room. He wanted to quarantine the new rats in case they were sick. He said he bought a second rat "just in case one didn't make it." I told him that sounded pretty harsh, but he felt that taking a chance to live in a loving home was better than the guarantee of a short life ending in a snake's belly. So how do you argue with that?

Well, right away one rat started sneezing. I was glad that they weren't in with Hide. We watched the new rats closely. The white-faced girl had bright eyes and was very energetic, whereas the brown-faced girl looked lethargic and squinty-eyed. After 24 hours we made the decision to move the white-faced girl (now named Cache -- keeping with the hidden theme) in with Hide. They bonded right away.

I named the other girl Sport (since she rode home on a Harley Sportster) and kept a close eye on her. After three days she seemed to be doing much better and we put her in the big cage. So now we have THREE rats. They each have a distinct personality too.
Hide wants attention -- and treats!
  • Hide demands attention. She will stomp on anyone to get to the front of the cage when people walk by. She loves having head rubbed just behind her ears.
  • Cache tolerates human attention, but doesn't seek it out. She'll sit in my hand and let me stroke her back. She loves the exercise wheel. I hear her running in it day and night.
  • Sport is a loner. Hide and Cache will cuddle together on the top level, but Sport prefers to hide in the cubby at the bottom of the cage. Sport doesn't like being held either, so socializing her is more difficult. (She doesn't bite, she's just really squirmy.)
Hide is about a month older and significantly bigger than the new girls. I've already introduced her to the tube. She runs in with no problem and is calm when Jedi sniffs with her inside it. In fact, getting her to come out was more difficult than getting her in. Apparently she liked it in there. I'm going to work on socializing Cache and Sport before introducing them to the tubes.

So, we have our hands full of rodents right now and I'm loving it. Even rat-hating Hubby is coming around. I'll catch him baby-talking to the girls. And he keeps baggies in the fridge of cheese bits and vegetable scraps that he doles out when he thinks I'm not looking. Don't tell him I know, OK? I'll share more later, but for now I have to feed animals and clean cages. That's one of the drawbacks to having your own personal zoo. TTFN, -- K