Saturday, August 12, 2017

Goodbye Z

Sad news from here: Jedi's mother crossed the rainbow bridge. She was a sweet dog and will be missed dearly. It's weird speaking of her in past tense. I will always be grateful to her for the wonderful pup she gave me. I'll think of her every time Jedi does the sneaky "scratch my butt" move that Zasha was famous for.


Golden Breeds Zente Zasha
4/2/2008 - 7/29/2017

It's been a bad summer for GSD club dogs. We also lost Colonel, Mikey, Tasha and Tundra. No matter how much time we have with our dogs, it's never enough. And with that, I'm going to log off and love on my dogs. I hope you do the same. -- K

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Rosie

During our South Carolina trip I finally got to meet Rosie the White. I'd heard so much about her. She is my cousins' white German shepherd, and she's absolutely beautiful.

Here are a few things about white German shepherds that you may not know:
  • White German shepherds are not albinos. The color is the result a recessive gene. 
  • The white gene has been present since the beginning of German shepherds. A white herding dog named Grief was the grandfather of Max von Stephanitz's foundation dog.
  • In 1933 white coats were deemed a breed standard disqualification by the German Shepherd Dog Club of Germany.
  • In 1968 white coated German shepherds were officially banned from competing in the conformation ring by the American Kennel Club (AKC).
  • In 1998 white German shepherds were officially disqualified from the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) breed standard and banned from the conformation ring. 
  • White German shepherds are allowed to compete in all other dog sports including obedience, rally, herding, agility and tracking.
  • Surprisingly, white German shepherds are still registered with both the AKC and the CKC. If both parents -- regardless of color -- are registered with the organization as German Shepherds, all puppies -- regardless of color -- are fully registerable as a German shepherd dog.
  • The United Kennel Club (UKC) recognized white German shepherds in 1999 and they are allowed to compete in conformation ring. I think the International All-Breed Canine Association (IABCA) also recognizes white GSDs.
  • The German Shepherd Dog Club of America (GSDCA) oversees the breed standard for AKC German Shepherd dogs. White German shepherds are a heated topic and the club argues amongst itself whether or not to allow them on a regular basis. 

There are clubs world-wide dedicated to the white German shepherd. The White German Shepherd Dog Club International, Inc. even holds national conformations shows. A simple Google search will provide you with hours of reading material.

There are breeders who specifically breed whites as well. And just like every other breed, it's buyer beware! The quality of these puppies can vary greatly. Do your research. Ask for health and temperament tests. My cousins did their research and found a great breeder. Rosie is wonderful. She is a healthy, well-balanced, even-temperament dog. Rosie is definitely a GSD. She takes her job as "family dog" seriously, providing love and protection to two active children.

Finally, Rosie has a famous littermate! He was all over the news in 2015. Her brother, appropriately named Lieutenant Dan, was born without a foot. The special puppy was given to a girl without feet. You can read the story and see pictures here. Warning: grab some Kleenex first. You'll need it.

OK, enough gushing over my cousins' dog. Jedi says it's time to get back to my own dogs. TTFN, -- K

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Who's At The Door?

Last week I told you about the strange couple that's been seen around town. Yesterday I received this picture from the dispatcher. The peahens stood outside the police department for several minutes before moving on.


Do you think they wanted to talk to Animal Control? We'll never know because it's Wordless Wednesday! Hop around below and see what others are sharing today. -- K


Saturday, August 5, 2017

More Crazy Work Stories

Not the ducks in question
Many of you have written me saying that you absolutely love the crazy work stories. Lucky for you, they're not in short supply. It seems that work has been extra crazy lately. Here are some of the calls I've had recently:

A woman called the police dispatcher to report ducks in her pool. She was frantic, afraid that they would drown. I arrived to find a female mallard and ducklings swimming in a pool that obviously hadn't been chlorinated in a very long time. The woman was upset because every time she'd scoop a duckling out with a net, it would jump right back in. (I DID NOT say something snarky.) I assured her that the mother would not let her babies drown, and the best thing to do would be leave them alone. However, to make her feel better we secured a float to the side of the pool so the ducklings could climb out. I would bet my last paycheck that they didn't use it.

Who else keeps newborn kittens on their desk?
One of my crazy cat ladies found a litter of kittens but couldn't find the mother. She said that she couldn't bottle feed them either because she has a job now. So, I picked up three two-day-old kittens. They couldn't stay in my kennel or else they would have starved to death. I couldn't find a foster family to take them until the following day so the babies came home with me for the night. It was awful. Kittens need to be fed every 3 hours. They also need to be stimulated to relieve themselves. Mama cats use their tongues; Kelley used a warm washcloth. Kitten poop is stinky, sticky and gross. Jedi and Roxy wouldn't leave the kittens alone. Jedi was the worst! I don't understand how he can smell anise on a Q-tip from 3 feet away, but must stick his nose on a kitten to figure out what it is. Fortunately, the kittens are now with a more qualified foster family.

Animal Control deals with the City ordinances related to domestic animals -- leash laws, feral cats, barking, etc. In theory, wildlife calls are limited to scoop and run (i.e. sick raccoons) or the immediate safety of the public. I'm not trained or have the equipment for most wildlife, so in moist case my office refers people to wildlife specialists. I DEFINITELY don't do snake calls. That being said, I had a snake call last week. A hysterical woman called 911. The dispatcher sent me to the address to see if I could calm her down and advise her. Ahhh, the joys of working in a small town. I arrived on scene to a woman standing in the middle of the living room holding a broom. Across the room was a large, sliding glass door. Jammed up against the door frame was a 3-foot garter snake who looked just as terrified as the homeowner. I was able to open the sliding glass door and use the broom to guide the snake outside. I have never seen a snake move so fast. The way I see it, all of us wanted the same thing, but I was the only one calm enough to think it through. I wish all calls were that easy!

I had a woman call me saying that an opossum was badly tangled in a soccer net and she couldn't get it out. She wasn't exaggerating. It was a cheap, child's net that folds easily for storage. The opossum had several pieces of the net wrapped around his neck and front legs. One leg was wrapped so tightly that the foot was beginning to swell. every time someone approached the opossum he would panic and flop around, tangling himself even worse. Thankfully, the homeowner was more concerned about the animal than the net and had no problem with me cutting her son's toy to shreds. I started with the head. The poor animal probably thought I was trying to cut his head off and kept biting at the scissors. He nearly bit me twice. I ended up shoving the end of a catch pole in his mouth to keep him occupied. Once his head was free I put the catch pole around his neck. This allowed me to safely position him while I cut the net from around his legs. He wasn't cooperating! He kept grabbing at the net with his dexterous feet and prehensile tail, tangling himself more as I was working. Fortunately, I was faster than he was and after 10 minutes he was freed. He stared at me for a moment or two and then ran into the woods -- without even a thank you.

I got an email from Code Enforcement. A resident sent in a complaint stating that the neighbor behind him didn't clean her back yard and he was "tired of smelling dog shit." To be honest, there's not much I can do about it. Our ordinances state that I can write a ticket to someone who doesn't pick up poop on public property -- and even on a  neighbor's property! -- but I have no authority to compel a person to clean their own property. That being said, I investigated anyway. I started with the complainant, who wasn't home. Then I went to the house in question. A teenage girl was home. I gave her my card and asked her to have her mom call me when she got home (I'm limited on what I can do/say to minors). THEN I went next door . . . And this is where the job gets weird. I knocked on the door and said:
Good Morning. I'm Officer Kelley with Small Beach Town Animal Control. I get a lot strange calls and investigate them all. That being said, may I go into your backyard and sniff for dog poop?
Yep. I did. Long story short: Didn't smell poop. Dog Owner cleaned her yard, then called to bitch about her neighbor. Complainant called (he saw me on his home surveillance) and bitched about his neighbor and his impotent HOA, the ones who should be handling this. And Next Door Neighbor knows Hysterical Snake Lady and she told him all about the incident. Luckily, she had nice things to say about me. Everybody knows everybody in Small Beach Town -- it's enough to make a girl paranoid.

All this happened in a two week period. During that time I also had cases involving: peacocks, two dogs with microchips (one was untraceable), feral cats in a trap, National Night Out, a dog bite at the pet store and crossing guard recertification. (That's one of my many "other duties as required." Click the link if you want to see some of the other weird stuff I do.) Like I've said before, this job seldom boring. -- K

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Not a Peep

I hate Peeps. You know, those gross sugar-coated marshmallow things that are sold every Easter. Even worse, they're now showing up during other holiday seasons in different shapes -- Christmas trees, pumpkins, hearts, etc. I've seen different flavors too, like chocolate, strawberry and cotton candy. Doesn't matter though, they're still disgusting. (What's that saying about polishing a turd?)


I have friends who think my Peep aversion is hilarious -- and they take every advantage to Peep me. I've received multiple boxes of Peeps in the mail. One friend made an elaborate Peep tray for a potluck. Another slipped a Peep into Jedi's Easter basket at a charity egg hunt. I was opening eggs expecting dog treats and found a marshmallow monstrosity instead. Blech. No need to imagine my reaction, it was posted all over Facebook.


The worst part: during the sugar-bunny bombardment, I was given a stuffed Peep toy. Jedi found it -- and he loves it! He carries it around the house and uses it as a pillow. It's so freakin' cute! I don't have the heart to take it away from him.


I think I'll change tactics and tell my friends that I hate wine and puppies now. Think they'll shower me with shepherds and shiraz instead?


Believe or not, it's Wordless Wednesday. Yes, I've used waaay too many words for a "wordless" post, but hopefully my punny title will earn me a pass. Anyway, hop around below and see what others are sharing today. -- K

Monday, July 31, 2017

Awww...What Is That?!

Here's the strangest Animal Control call of last week:

Peacocks in the Park -- absolutely scandalous!
These girls have been seen around the beaches for a few weeks. However, they just recently came to my tiny beach town -- and the residents are losing their ever-loving minds. I'm getting calls about the hens ten times a day. I can only imagine the pandemonium if there was a beautiful -- and noisy -- male running around as well.

Wildlife is outside of my expertise. I contacted the Florida Wildlife Commission (FWC) and was told that peacocks are considered native to the state and we are to just leave them alone. Apparently, this answer isn't good enough for some people and they're pissed that I'm not doing anything.

Fun Fact: Peacocks read signs better than many of our residents
This picture was sent to me by Code Enforcement and I'm still laughing. It seems that the peacocks are tired of being harassed. They were seen heading toward the police department, no doubt to make a complaint to Animal Control. This job is never boring

So, did the peacock story make you giggle? I hope so! It's Awww...Monday, where a group of bloggers come together to brighten the start of your work week. Click around below and see what others are sharing. Thank you Sandee for putting this together each week. Happy Monday! -- K

Sunday, July 30, 2017

We're Back

We're back from South Carolina. The AKC Show Committee Seminar was informative and overwhelming. I was given tons of paperwork. In addition to a handout of the PowerPoint, I came home with a bag full of official AKC rule booklets:
  • Rules Applying to Dog Shows
  • Rules, Policies and Guidelines for Conformation Dog Show Judges
  • Dog Show Stewards
  • Junior Showmanship
  • Rules Applying to Registration and Discipline
  • Dealing with Misconduct
  • Match Regulations
  • Obedience Regulations
  • Obedience Judges' Guidelines
  • The Steward in Obedience
  • AKC Rally Regulations
  • Rally Judges' Guidelines
  • The Steward in Rally
  • Rally Signs and Descriptions
To be honest, it's some dry reading. I'm going to sort out all the paperwork next weekend. And it appears that I'll to have to print out the 197 page 2017 AKC Show Manual myself. Unfortunately, that wasn't included in the ton of paperwork.

I learned a lot at the seminar. I also discovered that there's a lot more I need to learn. Ugh. But all in all, I'm glad I went. I met some very nice -- and more experienced -- people from other clubs. Each gave us a card and offered assistance via email. One woman told me that she had signed up this seminar three times in the past and it had been canceled each time. I guess RK, VP and I were lucky to get in first try.

After the seminar Hubby and I went to my favorite aunt's house. (Love you Auntie!) We spent time with my aunt, uncle, cousins and some friends who moved to SC several years ago. I also got to meet Rosie the White. (I'll tell you all about her in another post.)

On Saturday morning Hubby and I returned to the TD Convention Center to catch part of the dog show. GSDs were in the ring at 8 AM and I didn't want to miss them. I have priorities! Auntie went with us and I think she had a good time. I was able to narrate and answer questions, hopefully making it more enjoyable for her. I love dog shows and it's fun for me to share with others.

It's been a busy weekend and I'm exhausted. I need to unpack and watch Game of Thrones (again, priorities!) before heading off to bed. I have some fun stories to share later, so make sure to come back soon. TTFN, -- K